Allergens

Household allergens

Household allergens

Household dust consists of fungus, plant fibres, food particles, insect excrements, human and animal skin particles (epidermis). Moreover, dust mites, which have highly allergic qualities (including when dead), nest there. Dust mites are particularly fond of upholstery, mattresses, pillows, blankets, throws and carpets.
Pollen

Pollen

The following plants can cause allergies: trees and bushes — birch, alder, hazel, oak, maple, poplar, ash, elm, among others; grasses — timothy, fescue, meadow-grass, wheatgrass, fireweed, rye, buckwheat, wheat and others; weed — dandelion, hemp, nettle, wormwood, buttercup, etc. According to the times that these plants are in bloom, three periods of aggravated allergies are established: in the spring, when trees are in bloom (April, May), in the summer (pollen and crops in June and July), and in the fall (weed pollen in August through October).
Animal allergens

Animal allergens

Most frequently, allergy is triggered by dog and cat skin particles, as well as fur and wool used in filling upholstery and pillows. Likewise, it can be an allergic reaction to animal saliva or urine. Cats — short hair and long hair alike — are particularly dangerous. Insects — especially dust mites and cockroaches — are becoming a more frequent cause of allergy; less frequently moths, ants and other insects.
Food allergens

Food allergens

Although allergies can develop to any food product, most common include milk, eggs, fish, crustaceans, soy, wheat and nuts, especially peanuts. Furthermore, a cross-allergy can develop as a result of the same allergen. For example, a person suffering from peanut allergy can become allergic to other legumes, including peas, soy beans, lentil. Likewise, people, who are allergic to honey-dews, can develop allergies to cucumbers or pumpkins, or if you are allergic to shrimp, you can become allergic also to crabs. Some people develop allergies to sulphites — chemicals used to preserve the food colour, such as in dried fruit and vegetables. The reaction is manifested as difficulty breathing or a shock after eating food that contains sulphites. Sulphites can also lead to severe asthma attacks.
Fungal allergens

Fungal allergens

Fungi are microorganisms that thrive indoors and outdoors alike. Indoors fungi are mainly found in old wall finishing, air humidifiers, bathrooms, on shower curtains, in plumbing, waste baskets, food containers, and humid basements. Fungi are particularly widespread outdoors. They can be found in air, soil, salt and fresh water. An allergy can be aggravated after a walk in woods, a garden, or it can surface after raking hay, crops or leaves, especially in a humid and warm summer or in the fall. It is important to know whether the allergy is caused by fungi microorganisms, because this person might also be allergic to food products, which are made using fermenting: dairy products (yoghurt, sour cream, some soft cheeses, like Roquefort, Camembert, or cheddar), yeast and dough products (freshly baked wheat and rye bread, pastries), cabbages, smoked meat or fish, beer, non-alcoholic beverages, etc. Some people, who are allergic to fungi, do not tolerate antibiotics of the penicillin group.